Wing is a hobbyist that defines their art as pastel cartoons. Keep reading to find out more about the wonderful digital art that Wing creates.

Art by Wing
Art by Wing

Having recently gotten their hands on a Wacom Cintiq 13HD that they’re excited to apply their love of Clip Studio Paint to, Wing has been creating digital art for over a decade of their 28 years on this earth.

You can find more of Wing’s art on their twitter account, conquering their fear of posting their work on a regular basis.

I pestered Wing into interviewing for the Artist Spotlight as I’ve always loved their use of soft colors that really define their work.

How did you get into digital art?

Digital art is something I am surprised I still take part in. When I started, it was more of a job, and not the fun kind, doing a ton of digital coloring and lettering for people who didn’t let me take credit for my work; and when they finally did allow me credit, I was never paid for anything I did. Once I was out of that situation I finally was able to create for myself and make art that I liked to look at about the things that I enjoyed, and everything just sort of took off from there. 

Are you self taught or did you go to school for art? 

Art by Wing
Art by Wing

I am completely self-taught! I learned photoshop around the same time I learned how to use a computer and the internet, and a lot of my skills and knowledge come from tutorials online and art magazines. The rest of it comes from trial and error and inspiration from other artists and media that I enjoy. 

What do you do as a digital artist?  Is this a hobby, career or side gig? Do you take commissions?

I would definitely call myself a hobbyist. Though I’ve been an artist as long as I can remember and digital art has been a part of my life for the past decade, there are long gaps between each surge of creativity and inspiration. The most recent one came from a few close friends of mine and their encouraging words, so I’m back to drawing as much as I can and hoping it will stick this time.

I’d like to practice and get better at a lot of different things before I even consider attempting to sell my art to other people, but I do hope sometime soon I can open up commissions and have a steady flow of ideas from other wonderful creative people out there.

What would you say to describe your art style?

Art by Wing
Art by Wing

My art leans more on the cartoony side, with lots of pastel color choices and rounded lines. It doesn’t change drastically with each new piece, but I would say that my style is currently very moldable. I’m sure a lot of artists feel that way, I’ve seen people talk about ‘finding their style’. My absolute favorite step is the colors, and sometimes I skip right to coloring once I’ve got a finished sketch. I really should work more on my lines, I think. 

When I think about my best work, my mind often goes to that piece I did about a year ago, of my original character Cherry and a bunch of tabby slimes from the game Slime Rancher. I had just gotten into the game and it inspired me to push beyond what I thought I was capable of at the time. This resulted in not only a piece of art I’m still proud of but also the realization that I could do a lot more than I thought I could. I would say a successor of this is another piece I did back in May, of my World of Warcraft character Bowline as a mermaid; when I started, I knew what I wanted to draw, didn’t think I could, and ended up doing it anyway. I hope I get to create a lot more art than I initially didn’t think I could. 

What sort of topics in your artwork do you like to create?  A specific fandom, sci-fi, fantasy, landscapes, etc?

Art by Wing
Art by Wing

I have always, always gravitated towards original character design in all of my work. I write more than I draw, and when I get a character in my head I just want to know what they look like, it helps me flesh them out and include details I can’t show through words. I’ve never done a lot of fanart, but sometimes a show or a game I really love will inspire me to create and draw characters of my own in that same setting or genre. I’ve gone through a lot of phases, and this year I have drawn a LOT of World of Warcraft characters. I guess that’s just how inspiration works. 

“I think the most important thing to remember about art, in general, is to love what you’re doing.”

What motivates you to keep creating art?

It’s hard to get motivated sometimes to sit down and draw something, but I don’t think I will ever stop being motivated to create new characters and stories. That’s where I get a lot of my drive from, just this desire to take part in fictional adventures, and as long as I have that, I will always want to create art to go alongside my ideas. It helps that a lot of my friends are also creative and have wonderful ideas, so even if I’m burnt out, I can always draw their ideas and help them bring their characters to life. 

What knowledge would you like to impart to other digital artists, particularly new ones just starting out?

Art by Wing
Art by Wing

One thing that I wish I knew earlier, and I have to keep constantly reminding myself of, is that improvement does not come from doing nothing. If you have an idea in your head, a picture you want to see on paper and you think you can’t do it, do it anyway. It might not come out perfect, but if you keep at it, the process of creating something close to what you wanted will always teach you more than sitting around thinking that you’re not capable of it.

The easiest way to see how much you’ve improved, in case it isn’t entirely clear to you and you’ve lost some of your drive, is to redraw something you drew a few months or maybe even a year or two ago. Once you have those two images side by side, you will see that you’ve definitely gotten better, and maybe you will have a new skill or two to take with you to your next project. 

Do you have any other parting thoughts on digital art and what you do that you’d like to share?

Art by Wing
Art by Wing

Well, even though I still consider myself to be an amateur, I think the most important thing to remember about art, in general, is to love what you’re doing. If you’re not absolutely in love with something in your process, change it until you are. The finished product isn’t as important as your happiness with the steps that get you there, so don’t rush yourself and don’t push yourself beyond your limits if you don’t need to. Take breaks, look at your work with a fresh new perspective, and usually, that will be all you need if you’re stuck.

Please remember to look after your health, mental and physical! You won’t get very far if you haven’t eaten, had some water, maybe some sleep too. Getting your energy back and returning to a piece of art you’re working on will feel better than banging your head against the monitor for the same amount of time. Aaaah, I should probably take my own advice, I’m really bad about this part myself. 

Art by Wing
Art by Wing